I'm ready to suffer and I'm ready to hope

Virgo. INTJ. Gryffinpuff. Type 5/The Investigator. Metal Rooster. House Stark. Not sure how much I believe in any of this.
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petermorwood:

wiitch-craft:

free-vibin:

iloveyoulikekanyeloveskanye:

maybe humans are good for some things

this stuff makes me so happy 

the way the mother looks back at the end 

Humans are … not always bastards.

(via knitwit1912)

Game of Thrones/ASoIaF meme: Eight Quotes [2/8]

You Westerosi are all the same. You sew some beast upon a scrap of silk, and suddenly you are all lions or dragons or eagles.”

(via fuckyeahgameofthrones)

lurknomoar:

In the original books, Hermione was a clever, kick-ass character made highly relatable by her imperfections. The movies erased most of her flaws, making her a better ‘role model for girls’, but a far less interesting person: a typical weakly written strong woman. So here are a…

(via in-a-new-direction)

stitchedmoon:

friedcheesemogu:

ktopless:

a—psychedelic—mess:

these are beautiful, but why would you ever do this to a book?

^this

Okay this is something I have to answer because as a bookseller, as a bookseller working in a used bookstore, this is something I have to deal with daily. People get mad at me or express something like profound disappointment when I indicate that we recycle what we can’t use, and some of that recycling is the employees using books to make art and/or crafts like purses, buttons, collages, jewelry, etc.

You know why we do it? Because we love books. We recycle them so they can be made into new books by a company that we pay to do exactly that. We make them into art because sometimes there is nothing else you can do with them and the thought of just getting rid of them seems like a waste.

You may love books and hate to see them “destroyed,” but tell me what you, personally, are going to do with a full set of Encyclopedia Britannica from 1994? That’s 26 books of outdated information. When you have a stack of Twilight books that is literally two feet tall, is it really absolutely necessary to preserve the integrity of their bookiness? Or might it be more worthwhile to give them a second life? As a new book, as art, as something other than an object that takes up space in a store where we need as much as possible to sell the books you love and that we love too. I wouldn’t do this to, say, the Gutenberg Bible or a first edition Virginia Woolf, but something we see several times a day every day? Art is a pretty good fate for an otherwise unsaleable book.

No one is asking you to make incredible mountain ranges out of the books you love. But please consider that same love might have something to do with why people make the things they do out of books.

When I worked at a library we’d get tons of book donations from customers. We had an entire section upstairs to store them between book sales, and the staff who worked up there would still end up throwing out several dumpsters full every week because we just couldn’t keep them all. There was physically not enough space in the library for that many books. Granted, a lot of what got thrown out was old magazines, outdated textbooks, and stuff that just wasn’t relevant anymore, but some of it was still pretty cool and interesting (I used to go dumpster diving up there during my breaks, and I acquired a lot of neat vintage additions to my own library that way). And honestly, having seen what happens to these books that no one wants but nobody wants to get rid of, I think reusing them to make art is one of the better outcomes, and I’d like to see more of it.

I think people who love to read sometimes get this idea that books are sacred objects and altering them in any way is defacing them somehow—which I completely understand when you have your own collection and want to keep it in good condition and not let anyone fuck with it—but with stuff that’s just going to end up in the trash anyway, it’s kind of like honoring it by giving it a new life and imagining it as something more than just a container for old words. Y’know?

(via slumbrslumbrs)



House of Black | Astronomical Names↳Sirius Black

SIRIUS — “The Dog Star”ETYMOLOGY: Sirius comes from the Greek seirios (searing / scorching). In ancient times, Sirius rose before the sun during the hottest days of the summer (announcing the rising of the Nile River in Ancient Egypt). These days were known as the “Dog Days” of summer to the Ancient Greeks and Romans who believed Sirius was responsible for the extreme heat. Ancient Greeks also believed Sirius could have adverse effects upon actual dogs during the summer.NOTABLE FACTS & FEATURES: •  Brightest star in the night sky. •  Binary Star system — Sirius A and Sirius B (white dwarf).•  One of the closest stars to Earth — 8.6 light years away. •  26 times more luminous than the Sun.•  Part of the Canis Major (Greater Dog) constellation (one of Orion's hunting dogs).
Sources/Learn More  →  x | x | sky guide

House of Black | Astronomical Names
↳Sirius Black

SIRIUS — “The Dog Star”

ETYMOLOGY: Sirius comes from the Greek seirios (searing / scorching). In ancient times, Sirius rose before the sun during the hottest days of the summer (announcing the rising of the Nile River in Ancient Egypt). These days were known as the “Dog Days” of summer to the Ancient Greeks and Romans who believed Sirius was responsible for the extreme heat. Ancient Greeks also believed Sirius could have adverse effects upon actual dogs during the summer.

NOTABLE FACTS & FEATURES:
•  Brightest star in the night sky.
•  Binary Star system — Sirius A and Sirius B (white dwarf).
•  One of the closest stars to Earth — 8.6 light years away.
•  26 times more luminous than the Sun.
•  Part of the Canis Major (Greater Dog) constellation (one of Orion's hunting dogs).
Sources/Learn More  →  x | xsky guide

House of Black | Astronomical Names II  » print available

“The gold ones are Galleons… Seventeen silver Sickles to a Galleon and twenty-nine Knuts to a Sickle, it’s easy enough.” (insp.)

(via queenrhaenyra)



HOUSE OF BLACK | Astronomical Names↳Andromeda Tonks (Neé Black)

ANDROMEDA CONSTELLATION — “The Chained Maiden”MYTHOLOGY: Andromeda was the daughter of King Cepheus and Queen Cassiopeia of Ethiopia. One day, Cassiopeia angered the Nereids (sea nymphs) by claiming Andromeda was more beautiful than they. As punishment, the sea god Poseidon sent Cetus (a sea monster) to destroy Cepheus’ kingdom on behalf of the Nereids; only Andromeda’s sacrifice would appease him. Andromeda was chained to a rock and left for the monster until Perseus came to her rescue. Andromeda and Perseus then married and had six children. After her death, the goddess Athena placed Andromeda’s image among the stars (between Perseus and Cassiopeia).NOTABLE FEATURES:Size: 19th biggest constellation.Spiral Galaxy: Andromeda Galaxy1 — closest galaxy to the Milky Way & the most distant object in the night sky that is visible to the naked eye.Meteor Shower: The Andromedids — occurs in mid-November.Brightest Star: Alpharatz (Alpha Andromadae, Sirrah)2 — a binary star 200 times more luminous than the Sun.
Sources/Learn More  →  x | x | sky guide

HOUSE OF BLACK | Astronomical Names
↳Andromeda Tonks (Neé Black)

ANDROMEDA CONSTELLATION — “The Chained Maiden”

MYTHOLOGY: Andromeda was the daughter of King Cepheus and Queen Cassiopeia of Ethiopia. One day, Cassiopeia angered the Nereids (sea nymphs) by claiming Andromeda was more beautiful than they. As punishment, the sea god Poseidon sent Cetus (a sea monster) to destroy Cepheus’ kingdom on behalf of the Nereids; only Andromeda’s sacrifice would appease him. Andromeda was chained to a rock and left for the monster until Perseus came to her rescue. Andromeda and Perseus then married and had six children. After her death, the goddess Athena placed Andromeda’s image among the stars (between Perseus and Cassiopeia).

NOTABLE FEATURES:
Size: 19th biggest constellation.
Spiral Galaxy: Andromeda Galaxy1 — closest galaxy to the Milky Way & the most distant object in the night sky that is visible to the naked eye.
Meteor Shower: The Andromedids — occurs in mid-November.
Brightest Star: Alpharatz (Alpha Andromadae, Sirrah)2 — a binary star 200 times more luminous than the Sun.
Sources/Learn More  →  x | x | sky guide

(via queenrhaenyra)